War Prints .co .uk Home Page
Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Product Search         

Marlborough


[UP] - Roman Wars - Ancient History - Alexander the Great - Vikings - Medieval History - Marlborough - Scottish History - Battle of Dettingen - Napoleonic Wars - Boer War - British Colonial Wars - Civil Wars - Zulu Wars - Crimean War - First World War - World War Two - Modern Conflicts - Franco-Prussian War - Samurai - American History

History of the campaigns fought by the Duke of Marlborough, John Churchill, during the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

Click on the battle name to view the potted history:
  • Boyne River 1690
  • Blenheim 1704
    • After this brilliant victory the army went through several manoeuvres and marches which eventually brought on the decisive battle of Blenheim, when 24 battalions of French infantry and 12 squadrons of cavalry were captured. The village of Blenheim covered the right of the enemy's line, and the Greys were ordered to attack and drive out the enemy. Meanwhile the action became general along the whole line. The French and Bavarian allies were driven from their position and routed with immense slaughter. Marshal Tallard, the chief in command, was taken prisoner. The Greys and their comrades in arms dashed at the village, stormed position after position, charged and scattered its defenders. It was a glorious sight, one eminently calculated to stir the blood to madness and to nerve the army of the weakest. 8,000 allied cavalry, in tow long lines, charged the opposing horsemen, 10,000 strong. The artillery played so fiercely on the advance that they were at first forced to retire. Then the enemy's gun fire slackened. Marlborough put himself at the head of the Cavalry and with irresistible vehemence the line dashed forward. The French horsemen wavered and then fled pell-mell. The action was long and arduous, but British  pluck and dash prevailed. The enemy gave way, then rallied and attempted to force the cordon which was being drawn tightly round them. Each successive attempt was repulsed, until surrounded on every side they made on last desperate wild cat rush to secure their retreat. They took advantage of one loophole. But in vain! The Greys were too quick for them. They charged out, swooped down upon them and headed them off. The French were caged like rats in a trap, and sullenly threw down their arms. It was estimated at the time that our loss was about 12,000 killed and wounded, while that of the enemy was at least 40,000. In consequence of his brilliant victory he was made a Prince of the Roman Empire, which caused him to assume quite a considerable amount of state. He used to eat his meals alone, and made his son-in-law, the Duke of Montague, stand in attendance upon him. But this exhibition of personal vanity occurred only when he was abroad, where he was invariably recognised and saluted by the title of Highness. Excerpt from the Navy and Army Illustrated January 15th 1897 by G F Bacon
    • Blenheim was one of the few decisive battles of the world, and must be studied in conjunction with its international and political history if its effect is to be understood.  Europe, menaced by the aggressive power of Louis XIV, banded itself in 1701 into an alliance headed by England, Holland, and the Austrian Emperor.  When the hour came to strike the fateful blow it was an English soldier whose brain conceived, and whose skill and resolution achieved, the ultimate victory.  To John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough, "who never fought a battle that he did not win, and never besieged a place that he did not take," the British nation owes some of its proudest traditions, and the British Army its brightest laurels.  The operations that preceded the great struggle were cast in heroic mould.  Central Europe was a cockpit.  Many nationalities were involved.  The Moselle, Rhine, Danube and Inn were lines of strategical importance.  With consumate enterprise, Marlborough centred the issue at a point of his own choosing.  Marching rapidly, yet with good order, from Flanders to the Danube, he cleverly deluded a part of the hostile force until he found himself near the village of Blenheim, on the left flank of the Danube, at the head of 56,000 Allies, with 52 guns, opposed to about 60,000 of the Gallo-Bavarian Army, with 61 pieces of artillery.  Despite the parity of numbers the situation was critical, for the Allies were obliged to attack, the French troops were proved veterans, defeat meant disaster to Europe.  Marlborough had complete confidence in his men, and his confidence was well placed.  Advancing through a thick morning haze, the Allies, their left and centre under Marlborough, the right under the Gallant Prince Eugene, came upon Marshal Tallard almost before he could turn his guns upon them.  Difficult ground hindered the deployment of the right, but at length the assault on Blenheim was made.  This was repulsed, and, as the day wore on, the fortune of the Allies was in constant jeopardy.  Soon after five o'clock Marlborough brought into line 8,000 horsemen, supported by guns and infantry.  The final struggle was sharp but decisive.  The French fired and fought, but the line advanced; the fire slackened and the line charged.  The French horsemen, "discharging their carbines at an idle distance," spurred from the field, their infantry was ridden down, and Blenheim was won.  Voltaire states that of the conquerors about 5,000 were killed and 8,000 wounded, and that the French army was almost entirely destroyed.

    Blenheim

      The political situation prior to the battle of Blenheim, August 13th, 1704. The congress of Ryswick began its work May 9th, 1697, and by September 10th France with England, Holland, and Spain made three treaties.

               Austria, England, and Holland, September 1701, formed a coalition against Louis XIV and Maximilian, Elector of Bavaria.  William III died March 8th, 1702, but his policy was continued by the Earl of Marlborough; by Heinsins, Grand Pensionary, who directed the Republic of Holland with the powers of a King; and by Prince Eugene of Savoy, a Successful General and President of Council at Vienna.

               The Earl of Marlborough was at this time all-powerful for he had governed Queen Anne through the influence of his wife, he manipulated the Houses of Parliament through his friends, and the Ministry through his son in law, who was the secretary of State for war, and through Godolphin, the Treasurer, who was the father in law of one of his daughters. From 1701-4, the fortune of war alternated between France and the coalition.  Marlborough, with an army of eight cavalry regiments and 18 battalions, entered the Netherlands in spite of two French armies, captured four fortresses in 1701-2, and in 1703 took Bon and Luxemburg.  Marshal Villars gained a notable victory at Hochstadt, near Blenheim, and Marshall Tallard beat the Imperialists badly near Spiers, regaining Landau for France.  The Prince of Bavaria noew controlled the Danube from its sources to Passau.  The French Marshal Marsin had 20,000 men, and Tallard 40,000 on the Rhine, and the possibility of these joining the elector rendered the Imperial Government at Vienna very anxious.  The Duke of Marlborough now reverted to a bold scheme, which he had submitted to William III, but which the king had refused to approve; but he preserved and carried it out. Flanders was not so closely planted with fortresses as to render successive and decisive victories impracticable, nor could any success in the Low Countries relieve the situation of the Imperialists at Vienna.  Marlborough, crossing the Rhine and Bonn and the Main at Frankfort, met Prince Eugene buy appointment near Heilbronn. The French now had another army on the Rhine, under Marshal Villeroi, which Prince Eugene undertook to “contain,” while Marlborough supported by the Prince of Baden, should invade Bavaria, and coerce the Elector into abandoning his alliance with France. Marlborough, July 2nd, 1704, attacked Marshal Tallard in his entrenched camp at Schellenberg, immediately east of donauworth on the Danube, and routed him with great loss, losing himself 1,500 killed and 4,000 wounded.  The Elector took refuge in Augsburg, while Marlborough wasted his country down to Munich.  He then recrossed to the north of the Danube, and sent the Prince of /Baden to invest Ingoldstadt, 35 miles east of Donanworth.  This plan succeeded, for the Elector, with Marshal Tallard, passing the Dunube, took post at Hochstadt, near the scene of Villard’s victory over the Imperialists, gained September 20th, 1703.  Prince Eugene, demonstrating against Villeroi, so puzzled him that the Prince was enabled to join Marlborough in time for the battle of Blenheim before Villeroi ascertained where he had gone.  British Battles on Land and Sea

     

  • Donauwörth 1704
    • One of the battles in of the War Spanish Succession. Marlborough against Louis XIV. Marlborough marched his army of 52,000 up the Rhine from the Netherlands but turned suddenly towards the Danube to arrive at Donauwörth on 1st July. Here Marlborough met the forces of Maximilian II of Bavaria under the command of Count D'Arco. On 2nd July, Marlborough's men were ordered to a frontal assault and after losing over 5,000 men took the fortified hill. The Bavarian army lost about 9,000 men.
  • Ramillies 1706
    • King Louis XIV of France ordered the Duc de Villeroi to attack eastward from the Dyle river to the Meuse. They were intercepted by the English, Dutch and German allied troops under Marlborough who placed 50,000 men near the village of Ramillies directly in the Duc's path. After a feigned an assault on the enemies left, he attacked their right with determination. Marlborough's cavalry outmanoeuvred the French cavalry while the infantry made a direct attack on Ramillies. Villeroi's army was devastated with 15,000 killed, wounded or captured. This victory led to the surrender of Brussels and Antwerp.
    • During the two years that followed Blenheim, Marlborough was the soul of the Alliance.  His great persuasive power and personal charm were as much in requisition to soothe the apprehensions and susceptibilities of his comrades in the Netherlands, Vienna and Berlin, as were his military gifts to teach Louis XIV that at length he had met his match.  In April 1706, events were in train for a second staggering blow at the French power.  Marlborough was at the Hague contemplating a transfer of the theatre of war to Italy, partly from disgust at the timidity of the Dutch policy, and partly because he wished to join hands with Prince Eugene, the one colleague who had proved himself worthy of confidence.  Circumstances, however, compelled him to remain in the Netherlands, where the French, under Villeroi, were entrenched in their camp behind the Dyle, and the campaign offered but slight prospect of decisive result.  By a bold stroke Marlborough forced an issue.  A threat to besiege Namur brought Villeroi into the open in its defence.  At the head of the renowned household troops of France he took up his position on the 23rd of May on Mont St Andre, a part of the highest ground in Brabant.  He adopted a crescent formation, the tips of the half moon advancing towards the Allies.  This gave Marlborough, who lay facing the centre, the supreme advantage of being able to strike where he chose before his enemy could reinforce against him.  Part of the ground on the French right was an eminence called the "Tomb of Ottomond", which commanded the whole field.  This was the key of the position.  The opposing forces each numbered about 60,000 men.  The issue lay with superior generalship and valour.  Marlborough, whose objective was the "Tomb of Ottomond," made a feigned attack on the enemy's left, which Villeroi took seriously, only to realise, too late, the true intentions of the Allies.  Nevertheless, a strudy fight was made for the retention of the Tomb.  It was held by the French household cavalry, in whose ranks fought scores of young French nobles, who set fame before life.  These beat off the attack of the Dutch horse, and Marlborough had to hasten up with fresh squadrons.  In the turmoil he was surrounded, thrown from his charger, and nearly captured, but, taking the horse of his aide-de-camp, he renewed the charge with such vigour that the enemy gave way and the height was captured.  The success was rapidly followed up in the other part of the field, and three and a half hours after the first encounter the French were in full flight, abandoning their baggage and most of their guns.  In killed, wounded, and prisoners, they lost 15,000 men, whilst the Allies had over 3,000 casualties.

    Ramillies

    The year 1704 had been unfortunate for Louis XIV, whose schemes had failed in every direction, and after it he was reduced to act for the most part on the defensive.

               As a result off the decisive battle of Blenheim the French had to abandon the Elector of Bavaria and to re-cross the Rhine, and the Elector was compelled by the conditions of Peace to disband his army.  Marlborough’s aim in 1705 was to expel the French from the fortresses they had seized in violation of the terms of the treaty of Ryswick, and he manoeuvred trying to bring the French armies to action, but in vain.  His brilliant scheme to capture Saarlouis before the French could concentrate for its defence, by operating in the valley of the Moselle while Prince Eugene moved down the valley of the Saar to join him, failed, because the Emperor Leopold and the German Princes, once relieved of the French invaders of their country by the result of the battle of Blenheim, had relapsed into their usual state of apathy, and the British and Dutch Governments were obstructive.

               On Marlborough’s return to Holland, April, 1705, he persuaded the Dutch to agree to his schemes for invading France, but Eugene had now been sent to Northern Italy, to operate against the Duc de Vendome, and so was no longer available.

               When Marlborough took the field in the valley of the Moselle he had only 40,000 men, but Marshal Villars, though he greatly outnumbered him, fell back to a position whence he could cover Thionville, Luxemburg, and Saarlouis.  It was too strong for Marlborough’s numbers, and he waited for reinforcements from Germany.

               General Overkirk, left in charge of the defence of the Netherlands, had been obliged to retreat inside the entrenched position of Maastricht.  Marlborough, by a very long and rapid march, carried out in deluge of rain, completely deceived Villars, who lost touch of him and the Duke joined Overkirk, July 2nd, and then took Huy within a few days.

               The Commander-in-Chief of the Allies, by a skilful strategically movement, penetrated the French fortified lines which ran from Natwerp to Namur, a distance of 50 miles, breaking through at Tirlemont, but the Dutch then, again later in August, declined to utilise the favourable position which the Duke by his strategically skill had obtained.

               During the winter Marlborough visited Berlin, Hanover, and Vienna, but failed to induce the respective Governments to undertake any common action.  The Dutch had refused to allow their troops, and at last Marlborough threatened the States-General that he would withdraw the British contingent; this step they knew would involve the breaking up of the Coalition.  They then gave way, and suggested not only that Marlborough should select the Dutch Representatives who always accompanied the Allied troops but that moreover those Representatives should have secret instructions to comply with all his orders.  Marlborough was, nevertheless, doubtful of the possibility of success when working with such Allies, but just then Villeroi gave him an opportunity of gaining a great victory.

               The French Marshal, although ordered to await the arrival of Marshal Marsin, who was advancing from the Rhine, before undertaking any operations, got the idea into his head that the Allies were marching on Namur before they had effected their concentration, and he moved out his entrenched lines behind the Dyle river, hoping to crush the allies before they were ready to receive him, and Marlborough, seizing the opportunity, advanced on Branchion.  He, however, had concentrated his army and was moving southwards.

               Colonel the Earl of Cadogan, Quartermaster-General to Marlboroughs British troops, rode forward at 1 a.m. on May 23rd, 1706, in order to lay out a camp at Ramillies, two miles from the river Mehaigne, a tributary of the Meuse.  From a hill near Merdorp Cadogan sighted the French troops at 10 a.m. when a thick mist clearing away under a bright sun, disclosed an army of 60,000 men coming on to the Ramillies plateau.  The country unpaved roads were from constant rain very deep; the Allies guns were often up to their axletrees in mud, so Cadogen halted the head of the column to allow it to close up.

     The Battle Field

      The ground in which Villeroi elected to fight is a slightly elevated tableland in a flat country, on the slopes of which three streams rise: the Mehaigne, flowing eastward, passes the village of Taviers, two miles lower down, where the stream is 12 feet broad.  The great Gheete, rising close under Ottomond’s tomb, flows in a north westerly direction; the Little Geete oozes out of the ground at Rammilies, flowing in four small branches, generally in a north-easterly direction, past Offuz and Anderkirk.  We are writing from memory, but after careful inspection fifty years ago, are under the impression that the undulations on the battlefield are not greater than those from the Marble Arch across Hyde Park to Victoria Station, London.

               Villeroi put hisd right in Taviers and a hamlet a little to the east of it; his right centre stood at Ramillies, his left centre at Offuz, and his left at Anderkirk, the two flanks being half a mile in front of the centre, all facing eastwards, on a frontage of about four miles.

               Marlborough’s tactical skill in grasping the disposition of an enemy’s troops was a remarkable as was his strategically insight, and he noticed immediately the weakness of Villeroi’s position, in that the posts of Taviers and Ramillies were too far distant to allow the guns in those villages to cross their fire on an assaulting column, and that, more over, though his left in and near Anderkirk was secure, yet the troops on that flank could not advance for a counter-attack without much difficulty in consequence of the three streams of the little Gheete flowing in their front.  The Duke, therefore, decided to demonstrate against Anderkirk, hoping to induce Villeroi to strengthen his left.  For this purpose an advance was made on the extreme right of the Allies by the British contingent which moved forward formed in two lines as if about to attack.  Sometime later these lines retired, the proper front line up to the top of a rise of ground, where it halted, the rear line, after passing out of sight, turning southwards, and marching rapidly to reinforce Marlborough’s centre.  The ruse had the desired effect, for Villeroi, who had already occupied Anderkirk and Offuz strongly, now withdrew troops from his right to his left, going there himself.  Ramillies was entrenched, and held by 20 battalions with 24 guns.

      Advance of Marlborough

      When Marlborough’s army was ready he advanced the infantry of the Allies right in two lines, on a frontage of about three miles. 

               At 1.30 the artillery opened fire, four Dutch battalions carried the hamlet in front Taviers, gaining that village, which was defended by several batteries and a battalion, after a severe struggle; while 12 German battalions attacked Ramillies, which was stoutly held by the Irish Brigade.

               General Overkirk moving up on the left bank of the Mehaigne, charged as soon as the capture of Taviers enabled him to pass that village.  He routed the front line of French cavalry, destroyed two battalions of Swiss, but was then driven back, being saved from destruction by fresh squadrons, which were led forward by Marlborough’s in person.  In the hand to hand fighting which ensued the Duke was surrounded, and being recognised by French dragoons, was attacked by several men., and fell from his horse when attempting to cross a ditch.  His example, however, had greatly encouraged his squadrons, which closed up around the Commander-in-Chief. 

               Now 20 fresh squadrons coming up from the Mehaigne bank, Marlborough led them in a charge on the French right, and drove all its cavalry away, they leaving infantry alone.  These were now ridden over and destroyed.  The Irish Brigade garrison of Ramillies, who had fought hand to hand heroically, on seeing this disaster, gave way.  When Villeroi saw that its right flank was turned he gave orders, “Change font, right back,” pivoting on Anderkirk and trying to reform his right on Gerompont.  His baggage, which had been parked there, prevented the troops from getting into the desired position.  The British regiments had at this time been halted on the slope to the east of Offuz since the battle began four hours earlier, and were now allowed freedom of action.  They forded the Little Gheete, and carried Offuz with a rush.  This disheartened all the French troops near at hand, and even some battalions which, having retreated earlier, were moving back in good order, were ridden over by Marlborough’s victorious squadrons and sabred.  The fugitive army fled to Jodoigne, and the British troops pursued them, the cavalry only halting at Meldert, 15 miles from the battlefield, at 2 a.m. next day.

               The French casualties were over 13,000 in addition to 2,000 men made prisoners during the pursuit, while the British losses were only between 4,000 and 5,000 men.

               The effect of this disaster was great.  Louvain fell twenty-four hours after the battle, and then in succession Brussels, Malines, and later forced contributions in French Flanders, and Ostend surrendered July 6th.

               The Duke had let his triumphant troops in one month from the Meuse to the sea, and when the armies went into winter quarters France retained only Charleroi, Luxembourg, Mons, and Namur.

     

  • Toulon 1707
    • The Duke of Marlborough launched an attack on the port supported by the English fleet under the command of Admiral Cloudesley Shovell. However, on the day of the assault, 17th July, they were unsuccessful after the French massed forces to defend the city and port.
  • Lille 1708
    • Marlborough sent Prince Eugene of Savoy to lay siege to the fortress of Lille. Arriving on 12th August he invested the city while Marlborough covered the siege. Marshal de Vendome and the Duke of Berwick (nephew to Marlborough) sent a relief force but couldn't penetrate the allied lines. The battle eventually came down to supply lines and who could keep them open. Marlborough managed to open a line to Oostende in Belgium and Lille finally surrendered on 25th October, the citadel on 8th December.
  • Oudenarde1708
    • Marshal Louis Joseph (Duc de Vendome) was sent to retake Bruges and Ghent in spring 1708. From Ghent he then marched toward Oudenarde (or Audenaarde). This roused Marlborough to march from Brussels to Oudenarde reaching the town on 11th July. Marlborough used the surprise to attack the French lines immediately, Prince Eugene attacking their right flank and the Dutch under Marshal Overkirk attacking their left. Marlborough took the centre of the French line and by the close of day the French army hand almost been enclosed and surrendered. Allied losses were 3,000 casualties, French losses were 6,000 killed or wounded.
  • Malplaquet  1709
    • On September 11th the allied army attacked both French wings but only Eugene on the right managed to make headway while the Dutch on the left were savagely held. Marlborough then used the cavalry to strike a blow to the centre of the French lines and slowly pushed the French cavalry back. The French army then withdrew under Boufflers. This was the bloodiest of all the battles with 24,000 men killed or wounded on the allied side and 12,000 on the French side.
    • It was under very changed conditions, as compared with those obtaining when Blenheim was fought, that Marlborough met the troops of Louis at Malplaquet.  France was well nigh worn out by the prolonged war.  Famine within her borders, military disasters without, had caused her imperious ruler to look anxiously for peace.  To this end his craftiest Ministers sought by offers of individual advantage to detach the Allies from the pact.  Their efforts failed.  The Alliance held fast, and demanded such humiliating conditions that Louis was obliged to renew the struggle.  On the other hand, the political situation in England was such that Marlborough felt the necessity of achieving some victory that would justify the continuance of the war.  Had he consulted only himself, he would have welcomed a cessation of hostilities, but he knew that France must be further stricken if the peace was to be enduring.  In September 1709, the capitulation of Douai to the Allies, and the approaching investment of Mons, brought the hostile armies closer together.  The French, to the number of 110,000 were under the courageous and capable Villars, with whom was Marshal Boufflers, the brave defender of Lille.  Marlborough commanded much the same strength of various nationalities, with his tried comrade and friend Prince Eugene.  Villars encamped in a strong position between two woods near the little village of Malplaquet.  The Allies were drawn up opposite to him.  For two nights and a day the French General was allowed to strengthen his position by digging trenches and clearing his front, till early on the morning of the 11th September the Allied troops were led against him, the soldiers expressing their contempt at being "obliged to fight against moles".  Villars believed in his trenches and filled them with infantry, posting his cavalry in the rear.  The disposition of the Allies was a frontal attack, with a threat to enfilade the enemy's left.  Led by Prince Eugene and Marlborough the line advanced against the French left and centre.  Several times it was beaten back, but the attack was fiercely renewed.  Half an hour after the battle had opened the young Prince of Orange, acting without orders, flung himself against the right of the trenches, only to be repulsed with a loss of 2,000 men.  Although the Allies had not made much headway their onslaught on the flanks had withdrawn all the infantry from the centre, leaving the French cavalry exposed.  Instantly Marlborough turned his cannon on the horsemen, following up the fire with a cavalry charge headed by the Prince of Auvergne.  The charge had to be driven home no less than four times before the French gave way, but in the end the line was pierced.  The French retreat was orderly, the Allies being too exhausted for pursuit.  The cost to the victors was 18,000 killed and wouned; to the vanquished 14,000.  Writing of the battle many years afterwards, Bolingbroke said "A deluge of blood was spilt to dislodge them, for we did no more at Malplaquet".
  • Tournai 1709
    • The peace negotiations of 1708-9 broke down and the war resumed. The Duke of Marlborough decided to march an army to Paris but first he had to get through the fortified city of Tournai (in Belgium) which was defended by an army of 90,000 under the command of Marshal de Villars. On 27th June Marlborough and Prince Eugene advanced on  the city and the fortress which eventually fell on 3rd September.
War of Spanish Succession 1701-1714
  • 1701  Chiari
  • 1702  Cremona
  • 1702  Luzzara
  • 1702  Vigo Bay
  • 1703  Höchstädt
  • 1704  Donauwörth
  • 1704  Gibraltar
  • 1704  Blenheim
  • 1704  Málaga
  • 1705  Cassano d'Adda
  • 1705  Barcelona
  • 1706  Ramillies
  • 1706  Turin
  • 1707  Almansa
  • 1707  Stollhofen
  • 1707  Toulon
  • 1708  Oudenarde
  • 1708  Lille
  • 1709  Tournai
  • 1709  Malplaquet
  • 1710  Brihuega
  • 1712  Denain

The Battle of Ramillies

During the two years that followed Blenheim, Marlborough was the soul of the Alliance. His great persuasive power and personal charm were as much in requisition to soothe the apprehensions and susceptibilities of his comrades in the Netherlands, Vienna and Berlin, as were his military gifts to teach Louis XVI that at length he had met his match. In April, 1706, events were in train for a second staggering blow at French power. Marlborough was at the Hague contemplating a transfer of the theatre of war to Italy, partly from disgust of the timidity of the Dutch policy, and partly because he wished to join hands with Prince Eugene, the one colleague who had proved himself worthy of confidence. Circumstance, however, compelled him to remain in the Netherlands, where the French, under Villeroi, were entrenched in their camp behind the Dyle, and the campaign offered but slight prospect of decisive result. By a bold stroke, Marlborough forced an issue.  A threat to besiege Namur brought Villeroi into the open in its defence. At the head of the renowned household troops of France he took up his position on 23rd May on Mont St Andre, a part of the highest ground in Brabant. He adopted a crescent formation, the tips of the half-moon advancing towards the Allies. This gave Marlborough, who lay facing the centre, the supreme advantage of being able to strike where he chose before the enemy could reinforce against him. Part of the ground on the French right was and eminence called the "Tomb of Ottomond", which commanded the whole field. This was the key of the position. The opposing forces each numbered about 60,000 men. The issue lay with superior generalship and valour. Marlborough, whose objective was the "Tomb of Ottomond", made a feigned attack on the enemy's left, which Villeroi took seriously, only to realise, too late, the true intentions of the Allies. Nevertheless a sturdy fight was made for the retention of the Tomb. It was held by the French household cavalry, in whose ranks fought scores of young French nobles, who set fame before life. These beat off the attack of the Dutch horse, and Marlborough had to hasten up with fresh squadrons. In the turmoil he was surrounded , thrown from his charger, and nearly captured, but, taking taking the horse of his aide-de-camp, he renewed the charge with such vigour that the enemy gave way and the height was captured. The success was rapidly followed up in other parts of the field, and three and a half hours after the first encounter the French were in full flight, abandoning their baggage and most of their guns. In killed, wounded and prisoners, they lost 15,000 men, whilst the Allies had over 3,000 casualties.

Text by William Maxwell 1902.

Battle of Malplaquet

It was under very changed conditions from Blenheim when Marlborough met the troops of Louis at Malplaquet. France was well-nigh worn out by the prolonged war. Famine within her borders, military disaster without, had caused her imperious ruler to look anxiously for peace. To this end his craftiest Ministers sought by offers of individual advantage to detach the Allies from the pact. Their efforts failed. The Alliance held fast, and demanded such humiliating conditions that Louis was obliged to renew the struggle. On the other hand, the political situation in England was such that Marlborough felt the necessity of achieving some victory that would justify the continuance of the war. Had he consulted only himself, he would have welcomed a cessation of hostilities, but he knew that France must be further stricken if the peace was to be enduring. In September, 1709, the capitulation of Douai to the Allies, and the approaching investment of Mons, brought the hostile armies closer together. The French, to the number of 110,000 were under the courageous and capable Villars, with whom was Marshal Boufflers, the brave defender of Lille. Marlborough commanded much the same strength of various nationalities with his tried comrade and friend Prince Eugene. Villars encamped in a strong position between two woods near the little village of Malplaquet. The Allies were drawn up opposite to him. For two nights and a day, the French general was allowed to strengthen his position by digging trenches and clearing his front, till early on the morning of the 11th September the Allied troops were led against him, the soldiers expressing their contempt at being "obliged to fight against moles". Villars believed in his trenches and filled them with infantry, posting his cavalry in the rear. The disposition of the Allies was a frontal attack, with a threat to enfilade the enemy's left. Led by Prince Eugene and Marlborough the line advanced against the French left and centre. Several times it was beaten back, but the attack was fiercely renewed. Half an hour after the battle had opened the young Prince of Orange, acting without orders, flung himself against the right of the trenches, only to be repulsed with a loss of 2,000 men. Although the Allies had not made much headway their onslaught on the flanks had withdrawn all the infantry from the centre, leaving the French cavalry exposed. Instantly Marlborough turned his cannon on the horsemen, following up the fire with a cavalry charge headed by the Prince of Auvergne. The charge had to be driven home no less than four times before the French gave way, but in the end the line was pierced. The French retreat was orderly, the Allies being too exhausted for pursuit. The cost to the victors was 18,000 killed and wounded; to the vanquished 14,000. Writing of the battle many years afterwards, Bolingbroke said: " A deluge of blood was spilt to dislodge them, for we did no more at Malplaquet."

Text by William Maxwell 1902.

The First Guards in the great campaigns of Marlborough, from 1702 to 1711. 

While a detachment took part in the expeditions to Cadiz and Vigo, the regiment itself fought in the splendid operation in the Low Countries in 1702 and 1703. Marlborough himself became its Colonel in 1704. The fine strategic march on the Danube, that most brilliant conception of the great captain's genius, brought the First Guards with the forces, to Danauwerth and to the foot of the lofty fortified heights of Schellenberg, where the French and Bavarians, under D'Arco, were posted in a position of colossal strength. Fifty grenadiers of the First Guards under Captain Mordaunt, an impetuous son of a famous father, the great Earl of Peterborough celebrated in our military annuls, led the way as a forlorn hope, and in the terrific fire of grape, 40 of them fell dead or wounded. A withering hail met the advancing Guards, with Orkney's and Ingoldsby's regiments, and D'Arco, perceiving that the line wavered ordered a sally. The First Guards stood like a rock to receive the downward charge for a few moments almost alone, but help coming, a furious onslaught was made, and the enemy fled to his lines. Happily some Baden troops made a diversion, and very soon the Englishmen, with an impetuous rush, poured over the entrenchments and drove the enemy in panic from his works. At the decisive victory at Blenheim 6 weeks later (August 13th) the Guards again fought with the greatest intrepidity in the attack on the village palisades. Dormer, in command was killed; Mordaunt lost an arm; others were seriously wounded. (Excerpt from the Navy and Army Gazette November 20th 1896 by Leyland)

The Scots Greys during the Great Campaigns of Marlborough

The attack is delivered, the charge sounded, and away go the stormers, the cavalry moving up in support. The troopers, mounted on their strongly built grey horses, swing slowly along. Orders are suddenly shouted. The regiment dismounts, musket in hand, and with a cheer the gallant Greys, led by their colonel Lord John Hay, charge the French entrenchments. They leap over, an irresistible living flood; the enemy's ranks waver and finally break; they fly in every direction. The Irish Dragoons, who have been brigaded with the Scots, gallop off in pursuit. The Greys hastily remount and dash away to participate in the general rout. The day is decided, and the heights of Schellenberg are won.

After this brilliant victory the army went through several manoeuvres and marches which eventually brought on the decisive battle of Blenheim, when 24 battalions of French infantry and 12 squadrons of cavalry were captured. The village of Blenheim covered the right of the enemy's line, and the Greys were ordered to attack and drive out the enemy. Meanwhile the action became general along the whole line. The French and Bavarian allies were driven from their position and routed with immense slaughter. Marshal Tallard, the chief in command, was taken prisoner. The Greys and their comrades in arms dashed at the village, stormed position after position, charged and scattered its defenders. It was a glorious sight, one eminently calculated to stir the blood to madness and to nerve the army of the weakest. 8,000 allied cavalry, in tow long lines, charged the opposing horsemen, 10,000 strong. The artillery played so fiercely on the advance that they were at first forced to retire. Then the enemy's gun fire slackened. Marlborough put himself at the head of the Cavalry and with irresistible vehemence the line dashed forward. The French horsemen wavered and then fled pell-mell. The action was long and arduous, but British  pluck and dash prevailed. The enemy gave way, then rallied and attempted to force the cordon which was being drawn tightly round them. Each successive attempt was repulsed, until surrounded on every side they made on last desperate wild cat rush to secure their retreat. They took advantage of one loophole. But in vain! The Greys were too quick for them. They charged out, swooped down upon them and headed them off. The French were caged like rats in a trap, and sullenly threw down their arms. It was estimated at the time that our loss was about 12,000 killed and wounded, while that of the enemy was at least 40,000.

Although the regiment took a very prominent part in the struggle, they had wonderful luck, and lost not a single officer or man. By this great victory the French and Bavarian Forces were hopelessly shattered. The prestige of the former received such a tremendous shock that it never once recovered during the remainder of the war. The great English General very nearly met his death at Blenheim. A cannonball smashed into the ground so near him that he was quite covered with earth and dust, greatly to the consternation of his staff. By this wonderfully narrow escape Marlborough became convinced that it was an evident sign that a special Providence was taking care of him on that eventful day.

In consequence of his brilliant victory he was made a Prince of the Roman Empire, which caused him to assume quite a considerable amount of state. He used to eat his meals alone, and made his son-in-law, the Duke of Montague, stand in attendance upon him. But this exhibition of personal vanity occurred only when he was abroad, where he was invariably recognised and saluted by the title of Highness.

After the battle the regiment was marched into Holland to winter quarters. Before doing so, however, the King of the Romans visited the English Camp, the Greys with Marlborough at their head, formed a guard of honour to receive him.

Excerpt from the Navy and Army Illustrated January 15th 1897 by G F Bacon

Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 2 hours, 15 minutes!

King George II Knighting Trooper Brown After the Battle of Dettingen by J P Beadle.


King George II Knighting Trooper Brown After the Battle of Dettingen by J P Beadle.

Private Thomas Brown of the 3rd kings own regiment of Dragoons, is knighted by King George the II, (The last reigning British Monarch to be at a Battle) Brown had recaptured the regimental guidon from the French during the battle


More Text...
Item Code : DHM0322King George II Knighting Trooper Brown After the Battle of Dettingen by J P Beadle. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 13 inches (76cm x 33cm)none£30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £46.00

Quantity:
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 23 inches x 9 inches (58cm x 23cm)none£25 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £41.00

Quantity:
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 6 inches (31cm x 15cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (Two prints reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 13 inches (76cm x 33cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £38.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
The Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Tolnay by William Barnes Wollen.
for £55 -
Save £71


The Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Tolnay by William Barnes Wollen.


The Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Tolnay by William Barnes Wollen.



More Text...
Item Code : DHM0186The Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Tolnay by William Barnes Wollen. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print
Full Item Details
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £30.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print (2 ex display copies reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £25.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
King George II Knighting Trooper Brown After the Battle of Dettingen by J P Beadle (B)
for £55 -
Save £71


Battle of Dettingen by John Wootton.


Battle of Dettingen by John Wootton.

Depicting King George II overlooking the Battle of Dettingen. He was the last British monarch to be at a battle.


More Text...
Item Code : VAR0208Battle of Dettingen by John Wootton. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 13 inches x 10 inches (33cm x 25cm)none£8.00

Quantity:


Charge of the Third Dragoons, Battle of Dettingen by Harry Payne.


Charge of the Third Dragoons, Battle of Dettingen by Harry Payne.



More Text...
Item Code : VAR0607Charge of the Third Dragoons, Battle of Dettingen by Harry Payne. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£15.00

Quantity:
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph plate published by Raphael Tuck and Sons, 1915.
Full Item Details
Plate image size 7.5 inches x 5.5 inches (17cm x 14cm), paper size 10 inches x 7 inches (25cm x 17cm)none£58.00

Quantity:


Battle of Dettingen, 1743 by Henry Dupray. (P)


Battle of Dettingen, 1743 by Henry Dupray. (P)



More Text...
Item Code : HD0007Battle of Dettingen, 1743 by Henry Dupray. (P) - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique print c.1890, mounted on card at the time.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£75.00

Quantity:


Battle of Fontenoy by Edouard Detaille.


Battle of Fontenoy by Edouard Detaille.

Battle of Fontenoy during the war of Austrian Succession. French victory under Marshal Maurice De Saxe over the allies (British, Dutch and German under the Duke of Cumberland), 11th May 1745. Fontenoy, 5 miles south east of Tournai (Tolnay), the battle which started with a Dutch assault and British and Hanovarian infantry advance against the French centre during the battle a sudden attack by an Irish Brigade under French command, attacked the allied forces. The allied square was broken but the British, Hanovarian and Dutch forces retreated in good order.


More Text...
Item Code : VAR0123Battle of Fontenoy by Edouard Detaille. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet.
for £20 -
Save £8


Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet.


Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet.

Battle of Fontenoy during the war of Austrian Succession. French victory under Marshal Maurice De Saxe over the allies (British, Dutch and German under the Duke of Cumberland) 11th May 1745. Fontenoy, 5 miles south east of Tournai (Tolnay) the battle which started with a Dutch assault and British and Hanovarian infantry advance against the French centre during the battle a sudden attack by an Irish Brigade under French command, attacked the allied forces. The allied square was broken but the British, Hanovarian and Dutch forces retreated in good order.


More Text...
Item Code : VAR0375Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 7 inches (31cm x 18cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 40 inches x 28 inches (102cm x 71cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£590.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £240.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. (One reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £210.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.
for £58 -
Save £22

Buy With :
Battle of Fontenoy by Edouard Detaille.
for £20 -
Save £8


The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.


The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.

The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay. The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack. The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another. The story of what occurred is variously given. 'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats. The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as d.........


More Text...
Item Code : DHM0074The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 19 inches (76cm x 48cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £33.00

Quantity:
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 21 inches x 13 inches (53cm x 33cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £30.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (One copy reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 19 inches (76cm x 48cm)none£38.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Battle of Fontenoy by Horace Vernet.
for £58 -
Save £22

Buy With :
Fontenoy by Skeoch Cumming.
for £54 -
Save £24


The Battle of Blenheim by John Wootton.


The Battle of Blenheim by John Wootton.

The destruction of the Armada had preserved the life of Britain, The charge at Blenheim opened to her the gateways of the modern world, So wrote Sir Winston Churchill, the descendant of Marlborough. the battle fought near the Danube by the village of Blenheim in 1704. Between Marlboroughs Allied Army and the French Forces.


More Text...
Item Code : DHM0160The Battle of Blenheim by John Wootton. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £30.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (Two copies reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)none£31.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Marlborough Signing Dispatches After the Battle of Blenheim by Robert Hillingford.
for £65 -
Save £75


Marlborough Signing Dispatches After the Battle of Blenheim by Robert Hillingford.


Marlborough Signing Dispatches After the Battle of Blenheim by Robert Hillingford.



More Text...
Item Code : DHM0321Marlborough Signing Dispatches After the Battle of Blenheim by Robert Hillingford. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
Price!

Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £40.00

Quantity:
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)noneHalf
Price!

Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £33.00

Quantity:
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £300.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £200.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 gicle canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £250.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
The Battle of Blenheim by John Wootton.
for £65 -
Save £75


The Outpost (Dragoon c 1700) by Ernest Crofts.


The Outpost (Dragoon c 1700) by Ernest Crofts.

Possibly depicting Royal Irish Dragoons in the early 1700s.


More Text...
Item Code : DHM0493The Outpost (Dragoon c 1700) by Ernest Crofts. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £25.00

Quantity:
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (Three copies reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)none£31.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (One copy reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm)none£10.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Wallenstein, A Scene From the Thirty Years War by Ernest Crofts
for £55 -
Save £55


An Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV by a follower of Adam van der Meulen. (GL)


An Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV by a follower of Adam van der Meulen. (GL)



More Text...
Item Code : GIJL2927An Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV by a follower of Adam van der Meulen. (GL) - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £300.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £250.00

Quantity:


Marlborough Leading the Attack, Battle of Blenheim by Harry Payne.


Marlborough Leading the Attack, Battle of Blenheim by Harry Payne.



More Text...
Item Code : VAR0608Marlborough Leading the Attack, Battle of Blenheim by Harry Payne. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph plate published by Raphael Tuck and Sons, 1915.Part of the Glorious Battles.
Full Item Details
Plate image size 7.5 inches x 5.5 inches (19cm x 14cm), paper size 10 inches x 7 inches (25cm x 18cm)none£58.00

Quantity:


Battle of Malplaquet, 1709 by Henry Dupray


Battle of Malplaquet, 1709 by Henry Dupray



More Text...
Item Code : HD0002Battle of Malplaquet, 1709 by Henry Dupray - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Restricted edition of 200 prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique print c.1890 mounted on card at the time.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm) Some surface scratches.none£75.00

Quantity:


Battle of Ramillies, 1706 by Henry Dupray.


Battle of Ramillies, 1706 by Henry Dupray.



More Text...
Item Code : HD0003Battle of Ramillies, 1706 by Henry Dupray. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Restricted edition of 200 prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique print c.1890 mounted on card at the time.
Full Item Details
Some surface scratches. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£75.00

Quantity:


Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email: Email Us

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page