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Boer War


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The Boer Wars. History of the battles fought during the Boer Wars in South Africa from 1880-81 and from 1899-1902. These wars are also called the South African Wars.

The Boer wars were fought between the British and the Dutch Boers. Great Britain annexed the Transvaal in 1877 and the Boers revolt began three years later. On April 5th 1881 Great Britain recognised the South African Republic.

1st South African War:

  • Laing's Nek 1881
    • British troops under Sir General George Colley were marched toward British garrisons under attack from the Boers. At Laing's Nek they were halted by a detachment of soldiers from Petrus Joubert's Boer army. Colley attacked their positions on 28th January but was repelled with the loss of 200 men.
  • Majuba Hill 1881
    • General Colley's British troops occupied Majuba Hill believing it to be vital in the control of the pass through the Drakensberg Mountains. General Petrus Joubert, commanding the Boer army, attacked on the morning of 27th February and succeeded in wiping the British from the hill. Colley was killed in the action along with 280 others.

2nd South African War:

  • Mafeking 1899-1900
    • General Piet Cronjé was ordered, by Joubert, to attack Mafeking on 13th October. Colonel Baden-Powell, commander of the garrison at Mafeking, managed to fend off this first attack. Cronjé then left a lieutenant in charge while he took half the men to a battle elsewhere. The Boers laid siege to the town and held on until a relief force arrived under Sir Bryan Mahon on 17th May 1900. The siege lasted 217 days, with the loss of 1,000 Boers and 273 British.
  • Kimberley 1899-1900
    • Cronjé's army marched toward Kimberley and attacked on 14th October but the British garrison fought off the attack which then turned into a siege. Kimberley was relieved on 15th February by General Sir John French.
  • Ladysmith 1899-1900
    • Under Piet Cronjé the Boer Army were marched toward Durban to try to capture the port. General Sir George White had the tasked of defending the port and on 20th October they met at Talana Hill. The British were pushed back but managed to hold the Boers for a time at the Dundee - Ladysmith railroad. However, the Boers continued to push the British back to Ladysmith and at Nicholson's Nek two battalions were taken prisoner after being surrounded. By 1st November General White had fallen back to Ladysmith where the Boer army proceeded to bombard the town. On February 28th after 119 days under siege, the garrison at Ladysmith was relieved by General Sir Redvers Buller and his army.
  • Modder River 1899
    • In October while Joubert attacked Mafeking, Piet Cronjé attacked Kimberley. It was General Methuen's job to relieve the besieged town and marching into the Orange Free State he met Cronjé's Boer army at the Modder River. The Boer army were greater in numbers but the British persevered and eventually turned the enemy position. Cronjé withdrew.
  • Stormberg 1899
    • One of General Buller's British columns marched towards Stormberg under the generalship of William Gatacre. During the night the column advance to where they believed the Boer positions to be but ended up marching into heavy enemy fire. They had to withdraw leaving 600 prisoner.
  • Magersfontein 1899
  • Colenso 1899
  • Spion Kop 1900
  • Vaal Krantz 1900
  • Paardeberg 1900
  • Bloemfontein 1900
  • Johannesburg 1900

Magersfontein 1899

  The battle of Modder River was fought November 28th, 1899.  Early in the following morning British column crossed the river unopposed, and was now within twenty-five miles of Kimberley.

           Lord Methuen did not feel string enough to resume immediately his advance.

           During the past week his troops had been engaged in three actions, and ere, he thought, in need of rest; as were also the horses.  The ammunition train was almost empty, and the column required reinforcements to make up for the 1,000 casualties it has sustained since leaving Orange River.

          De la Rey’s Genius for War

That the general should have felt it necessary to halt was unfortunate, delay being more to the enemy’s advantage than to his own.  Has he advanced at once his troops would have found themselves opposed by a force of Boers considerably less numerous than themselves-dispirited, moreover disunited, and only partially entrenched in an ill chosen position.

           By December 10th, when the advance was resumed, Cronje was able to bar their progress with a force nearly as equal to their own in numbers in a position naturally strong, and well entrenched.

  After the battle of Modder River, the defeated Boers fallback to Jacobsdal, and were joined in the morning by the Mafeking contingent, which had arrived too late to take part in the day’s action; and on that same afternoon Cronje moved north to Spyfontein, where be began to entrench a position along the summits of the hills.

           Reinforcements were now hastening to the Boers, and within a few days Cronje had nearly 8,000 men under his command, more than twice as many as he had at Modder River.

           On December 2nd De la Rey-to whose military genius the enemy’s brilliantly conceived dispositions at Modder River were due-came to the conclusion that the position at Spyfontein was not so strong as was commonly supposed owing to the ease with which it could be shelled from the group of hills to the south of it.

           He urged Cronje, therefore, to take up a more advanced position at Magersfontein, his contention being that the British would be compelled to attack there over flat again open ground.

           With some reluctance Cronje yielded to De la Rey’s suggestion, and on December 4th the Boers abandoned their northern lines, and began, in full view of the British camp, to entrench a new position.

           The most remarkable feature of their defences was a line of trenches 3 to 4 feet deep, and narrow as a protection against shrapnel fire, extending, nor along the summit but along the foot of the hills, on a level with the plain.  This original selection and construction was due to De La Rey.       

           As De La Rey foresaw, it would be difficult for the British artillery, even after they had detected where his men were lying to avoid overshooting the mark, and thus wasting their fire o the hills which rose abruptly in the rear.

  The Boer Position

  The Boer position extended over a front of more than twelve miles.  It was in the shape of a large semicircle, extending from a point a mile and a half to the north-west of the railway at Merton Siding to Moss Drift on the Modder River, six miles east, or upstream, of Modder River station.

           When the British advance began, December 10th, the defences at the extremities were incomplete, they being an after thought to guard against a turning movement.

           The Boer leaders, however, had little doubt but that Lord Methuen would attack, as he did, at Magersfontein Kop, which lay in the centre and was the key of the position.

  It has not, we believe, been explained why Lord Methuen did not occupy and entrench the hills round Magersfontein, immediately after crossing the Modder river; nor why, when the Boers moved south from Spytfontein, he took no steps to molest their construction of a new line of defence.

           During the twelve days halt, stores and ammunition had been received in the British camp; and General Wauchope arrived with the 2nd Black Watch and the 2nd Sea forth Highlanders.  The 12th Lancers, 100 mounted infantry, G Battery R.H.A, a 4.7 naval gun, the 65th Battery, a balloon section, and the 21st Gordon Highlanders came upon up later.

           Lord Methuen had intended to advance up the Modder River to Brown’s Drift, and then to turn north with a view to outflanking the Boer position.  But later he decided to deliver a direct attack on the Magersfontein ridge.

  Lord Methuen’s Plan

  The former plan was apparently sounder.  It would have involved a flank march across the enemy’s front, but that in itself was not a serious objection, for the line of march would have been beyond the range of Cronjes guns; and the only way I which the enemy could have interfered with it would have been by abandoning their position and giving battle in the open, for which neither their discipline nor training was sufficient.

           Lord Methuem, however, was anxious to strike a heavy blow at the Boers at once, and to avoid, if possible, a slow turning movement.  The success gained at Belmont moreover had impressed him with the advantages of a night attack, and he felt confident of being able to carry Magersfontein Hill in the same manner.

           At 3 p.m., December 10th, the Highland brigade under General Wauchope to whom Lord Methuen entrusted the night attack, moved forward to a slight rise, four miles north of the camp, known subsequently as Headquarters Hill; and that same afternoon in the hope of demoralising the enemy, heavy fire from there greater part of the artillery was concentrated on the slopes of Magnerfontein hill.

          The Value of Entrenchments

 For an hour and a half cannonade continued.  Large boulders were hurled 50 feet into the air by the bursting lyddite; whilst the hail of shrapnel threw up the red earth on the hillside in what looked like jets of flame.

           The Boers were well covered in their deep, narrow trenches, and only three were wounded.

           De La Rey could not have wished for a better proof of the value of his entrenchment, and the small result of the artillery fire inspired the burghers with confidence, although they realised that the cannonade was the prelude to an attack.

           Under Lord Methuen’s arrangements, general Pole-Carew was to leave part of the 9th Brigade to guard the camp, and with the Northumberland Fusiliers and the Northamptonshire Regiment to advance up the railway and demonstrate against the enemy’s right flank.

           The Guards were to move to Headquarters Hill and there remain, ready to act as a support.

           The highland brigade with the cavalry covering its right flank was to move off half an hour after midnight for the attack; then just before dawn, to deploy and rich Magerfontein Hill.

           General Wauchope undertook his task with reluctance.  He recognised its Hazardous nature, and expressed his doubts of the chance of success to Lord Methuen.  But once committed to it, he resolved to see it through at all costs, in spite of the pitiless storm, which began at nightfall.

            Soon after 12.30 a.m. the Highland Brigade advanced, guided by Major Benson, RA. Who had already carefully explored the ground.  The Black Watch led, next came the Seaforths, then the Argyll’s, and Highland Light infantry.  The Gordon Highlanders had only arrived in camp that evening, and did not move off till later.  The troops were drawn up in mass of Quarter column, the left guides holding ropes in order to keep the battalions in formation.

           It was a rough night.  Rain had been falling heavily all the evening; and just after the column started a terrific thunderstorm broke over it, the vivid flashes of lightning serving to intensity the darkness.

           Although drenched to the skin, the Highlanders stumbled cheerfully on through the murky night over sodden veld.  They were eager to come to grips with the enemy somewhere ahead of them, somewhere between them and that misty shaft of violet light, which dipped and rose in the far distance above Kimberley-the De Beer searchlight.

           The advance was very slow slower, owing to the bad weather, than night marches usually are.  Again and again the troops were halted, so heavy was the going and so rough the ground; and at 3.30 a.m. when the blackness of the night began to turn to grey, some distance still intervened between the column and its objective.

           Major Benson suggested that the time had come to deploy.  But Colonel Wauchope, anxious to keep the troops as long as possible in a formation, which enabled him to control them, moved on a little farther.  He was anxious to get within striking distance of the hill at break of dawn.

           After, another half mile was gained; then the order to deploy was given.  But at this moment the Black Watch came on a line of thorny bushes.  To deploy there was difficult, and rather than losing time by brining back the head of the column the General decided to get the whole brigade past the obstacle before it deployed.

           This necessitated advancing 400 yards farther, but it was accomplished without mishap, and Wauchope had brought the column within 700 yards of the hull.

           He gave the order to deploy.  He knew his men and relied upon them to do their work.

           But neither Wauchope nor anyone in his command knew that between the British and the hill, within 400 yards, was a line of Boer trenches lined by thousands of eager men, peering intently through the gloom and listening for the slightest sound that might betray the expected attack.

           Daylight was already showing above the hilltops as two leading companies of the Black Watch began to deploy.

           Then the Boers saw them, dim, grey figures in the distance; and a moment later an appalling hail of lead struck into the serried ranks of the Highland Brigade.  The troops were not merely surprised; they were caught at a moment when they were changing from one formation to another.

  Death of General Wauchope

  The two leading battalions bravely endeavoured to hasten their extension; then lying down, fixed bayonets ready for the charge.

           But moneymen among the rear companies of the Black Watch, flinching before that dreadful unseen fire, ran back on the Seaforths still in column.  And as they ran they infected others with their terror.  The line of bushes, which had arrested the deployment, afforded nearly half the brigade broke and rushed back in disorder from that storm of bullets taking such cover as.

           On the scene of the disaster, however a steadfast remnant still remained, lying prone, awaiting the General’s orders.

           General Wauchope hurried forward, and taking in the situation at a glance, sent back his cousin with orders to Colonel Coode for the Black Watch to reinforce on their right.

           Young Wauchope gave the order; then returned to the General’s side, only to find him dead.  A moment later the devoted aide-de-camp fell also.  Colonel Coode too, as he gallantly led his men to the right in compliance with the order was killed immediately.

           Colonel Hughes-Hallet, the only commanding officer now unscathed, promptly doubled out the Seaforth Highlanders to the right, in the wake of the Black Watch.  The men of the two regiments soon became inextricably mixed up, but they resolutely rushed on, and small detachments, breaking through a gap in the Boer trenches at the eastern extremity of the hill, gained a footing on the lower slopes.  But they were forced to fall back, being caught now between the rifles of the enemy on their right and the shrapnel of the British guns, which had just opened fire. 

  A Curious Incident

   There was a curious incident some minuets after the burghers opened fire from their hithero-concealed trenches.  Several men of the Black Watch and Seaforth Highlanders doubling out to the right had got close up to the Boer Trenches, crawling though a wire fence, only to be stopped somewhat farther on by another similar obstacle.  Captain Mcfarlane, of the Royal Highlanders, led a party of 25 men up the south face of the hill, but fired on heavily by the Boers, he was eventually driven back by the Shrapnel of our own guns.  Lieutenant Coxx, of the Seaforth Highlanders, with four men, actually climbed the hill, but all five were killed.

           Another party rushed along under the base of the hill, and had not Cronje appeared at the moment, might have been followed by other gallant men, and have taken the Boer trenches in reverse.  The Boer General slept in his cloak in the heavy rain on Magersfontein Hill until 1 a.m. when he rode to the left of the trenches to ensure that the burghers were in position and o the alert.  The Commandant and the six, members of his staff lost their way in the darkness and pouring rain, and eventually got back again near the foot of Magersfontein Hill, and took cover when the bullets whistled over their heads during the attack.  One of the Boer Staff caught sight of the little party of Highlanders climbing in the hill and pointed them out to Cronje, who with his companions emptied their magazines on their assailants.  Some Boers lying in the trenches a little to the easts of the hill, now running up drove the Highlanders back.

           The situation became like that at Modder River.  To advance was impossible, but the troops would not retire.  So the infantry, with dogged determination, lay just where they were, waiting for the guns to come up from the rear to their assistance and maintain the battle. 

           Day had barely broken when the guns opened fire, and, despite the ill-effect which the first shells had on Hughes-Hallett’s advance, they did good working keeping down the enemy’s fire, the howitzers a 3,500 yards and the big naval gun plying the hill lyddite, while the field batteries opened at 2,500 yards.  

           Towards 6 a.m. the 18th Battery moved forward to within 1,400 yards of the trench and was after joined by the 62nd, the two batteries remaining in this position throughout the day.  The 75th Battery assisted in checking the efforts made by the Boers, entrenched to the southeast of Magersfontein Hill, to enfilade the right of the Highlanders.

    A Dangerous Position

  After the night attack ha failed, the position of this exposed right flank became dangerous; and it was due almost entirely to the unconventional use which General Babington made of his Cavalry, and to the fire of the mounted infantry, that the Highland Brigade was not crumpled up within an hour of daybreak.

           Seeing that the Boers were threatening Hughes-Hallett’s flank, he brought up the 12th Lancers and the Mounted Infantry, under Lord Airlie and Major Milton, dismounted them, and sent them into the firing line on the right of the highlanders.

           Later the cold stream and Grenadier Guards came up and relieved the pressure at this point.  The Lancers then returned to their horses.

           Lord Metheun learned almost at once of the disaster, which had befallen the Highland Brigade.

           That such a thing might happen he had not it seems even contemplated.  He had no plan ready for retrieving the disaster; and although, including the 2nd Gordon Highlanders, there were five battalions available, he did not send one forward to the assistance of the stricken brigade. 

           He directed Sir H Covile, however to take the Guards due east towards a low, bushy ridge facing the extreme left of the Boer position, instructing him not to advance beyond the ridge, but there to hold himself I readiness to cover, if necessary the retirement of the whole force.    

  The Cold Streams in the Firing Line

  The Cold Stream Guards, as has already been stated, subsequently replaced the Lancers in the firing line.  Colvile, however, made no effort to break through the enemy’s line.  Yet, according at any rate to Boer, accounts it must have succeeded, for the burghers on the left showed unsteadiness throughout the morning, and it was all the commandants could do to keep them in the half finished trenches.

           An aggressive movement, on the part of Pole-Crew could hardly of failed to bring relief to the Highland Brigade on the other flank.  Had Pole-Carew pushed on, and occupied the little hill which rises immediately to the east of the railway, at the point where the enemy’s line bent back sharply to the north-west, we would have been able to enfilade the whole of the Boer trenches in the centre.

           Lord Methuen could not, from where he was occupied, realise the advantage of such an attack; and Pole-Carew did not advance because he had been ordered merely to demonstrate against the enemy’s right and to him had been entrusted the safety of the camp at Modder River.

           From 6 to 11 a.m. therefore the battle remained stationary, Methuen’s idea being that his men should hold that his men should hold o till night, when he hoped that the Boers, as happened at Modder River, would become demoralised, and retire under cover of darkness.

           The General, endowed by Nature with great personal courage and endurance, did not apparently fully understand what he was asking the shaken Highland Brigade to do.  At 11 o’clock it had already hung on for more than six hours in a very trying position.  Hungry and thirsty, moreover, the men were now suffering from a burning African sun.  Most of their officers had been wither killed or wounded; and every main the ranks had long become convinced that he could do no good by remaining those exposed within easy range of good shots in those hidden trenches, and their determination perceptibly began to weaken.

           At 112 a.m. Lord Methuen, seeing that the centre of the line was wavering, sent forward reinforcements-six companies of the 2nd Gordon Highlanders, under Colonel Downman.

           The Gordon’s advanced in widely extended order, and by a series of conducted rushes, succeeded, despite the galling fire, which greeted them, in getting within 400 yards of the enemy’s trenches.  It was a fine effort, but useless.  Six companies in broad daylight could not hope to carry the position.  The companies would have had a greater steadiness influence on those they tried to support had they been halted at 800 yards from the trenches.

  Intense Strain on Highlan ders

   Thus, although the advance of the Gordon’s gave a temporary encouragement, it did nothing really to relieve the strain on the Highland Brigade, and that strain was rapidly approaching a breaking point, especially on the right flank, where, throughout the morning, the struggle had been swaying backwards and forwards.  By midday, so intense had the strain at this point become that Hughes-Hallet twice sent messengers to General Colvile urging him to send forward reinforcements.

           Neither of the messengers, however, succeeded in delivering the message, and at 1.30 p.m. Hughes-Hallett was compelled to throw back his right as the only means of checking the Boers, who, advancing, were now making an effort to enfilade the scattered brigade.

           Colonel Downman, who at the time was lying in n the very front of the firing line, more than two miles away, saw the right come back, and, knowing that Hughes-Hallett was acting as Brigadier, assumed that a general retirement was intended to a less deadly range.

           Downman was unaware that Lord Methuen had told Hughes-Hallett to hold on at all cost until nightfall.  He ordered his men; therefore, to retire towards the guns; and the whole of the line conformed to the movement.

  Captain Towse V.C.

At first the men fell back in good order.  But as they retreated, the storm of fire from the enemy’s trenches broke forth with increased effect, and the Highlanders ran, suffering severely.  Downman was among the first to fall, being mortally wounded ad he raised in the firing line.  Captain Towse, of the Gordon’s, however, stood by the side till Sergeant Nelson and Lance-Corporal Hodgson came to his aid helped him carry back his Colonel under heavy fire.  For his conspicuous gallantry on this occasion and on April 30th, 1900, when he was terribly wounded, Captain Towse received the Victoria Cross.

           When the men of the highland brigade began to retire it was impossible to rally them, Colonel Hughes-Hallett an other officers did all they could, but the men had had enough, and fell back rapidly, even beyond the guns, which for a time were left exposed to attack.

           An effort to reform was made.

           “The men,” according to one vivid narrative, “were dazed by what they had undergone, and Nature shrank back from that deadly zone where the bullets fell so thickly.  But the pipes blew, and the bulges sang, and the dispirited men, the backs of their legs so flayed and blistered by lying in the sun that they could hardly bend them, hobbled back their duty.”  But just then the Boer guns, which, which for some reason unexplained, had remained silent all day, suddenly opened fire.  The first shells burst in the midst of the rallying crowd.  A moment later, the sorely tried men were in full retreat across the plain, and the brigade, as such, was not re-formed until after dusk.

           This final route came as a bitter disappointment to Lord Methuen.  Up to thsat time he had hoped that the highland Brigade might yet hold its position until nightfall, and so enable him to retrieve the fortunes of the battle by another attack on Magersfontein Hill at early dawn.

           After some desultory skirmishing on the right the long days action came gradually to an end.  The howitzers and naval gun continued-but slowly than before-to shell the enemy’s lines, but after 4 p.m. there was no fighting; and the British troops, who with the exception of the Highland Brigade still held their position, sank exhausted to the ground.

           Many men fell sleep, lulled by the thunder of the guns, and woke only to find the sun setting and the firing at an end.  But for the Medical corps no rest was possible.  They had been busy all day.  They were busy all night.  Their quiet courage and devotion is deserving of the highest praise; Lord Methuen freely acknowledged it in his dispatches.

  At dawn, when General Colvile repaired to headquarters for instructions, he found Lord Methuen proposed an immediate retirement on Modder River camp.

           General Colvile was avers to this course.  He maintained that there was still a hope of the Boers abandoning their positions, but the general opinion of the Staff was in favour of a retirement.

           In the view of this, Lord Methuen adhered to his original intention, and at noon the entire force withdrew.

  The British casualties at the battle of Magerfontein amounted to 971, of whom 201 were killed, 23 being officers.  The bulk of the loss naturally fell on the unfortunate Highlanders, who, excluding the Gordon’s, lost 46 officers and 706 men killed and wounded.

           The Boer losses were about 250.

   A night attack is proverbially a difficult and hazardous operation.  Most soldiers will, therefore, hold that the General’s persistence in the operation under very unfavourable weather conditions was an error, and the less excusable in that Kimberley, only 20 miles distant, had still six weeks food supply.  And the blunder was the more unfortunate in that it had the effect of breaking up, to all intents and purposes, the Highland Brigade, whose oft-proved courage has been the envy of all armies of the world.

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Ambush at Sannas Post by Terence Cuneo.


Ambush at Sannas Post by Terence Cuneo.

Four VCs were awarded to Q battery for getting their guns into action against 1,000 Boers concealed behind a ridge, near Blomenfontein in 1900.
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Within Sound of the Guns by Lady Elizabeth Butler.


Within Sound of the Guns by Lady Elizabeth Butler.

The picture shows a despatch rider coming under fire from Boer Marksmen. The picture is also known as A Yeomanry Scout Galloping With Despatches in the Boer War.
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My Brave Irish by Richard Caton Woodville


My Brave Irish by Richard Caton Woodville

The last charge on Pieters Hill, 27th February 1900 by the 2nd Irish Fusiliers, assisted by the 2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
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Jameson's Last Stand, Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Richard Caton Woodville


Jameson's Last Stand, Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Richard Caton Woodville

In 1895, Leander Starr Jameson assembled a private army outside the Transvaal with the aim of invading and overthrowing the Boer government. The idea had been to encourage civil unrest among foreign workers (Uitlanders), and use the outbreak of open revolt as an excuse to invade and take over the territory. But Jameson grew impatient and so launched the Jameson Raid on 29th December 1895, and managed to push within twenty miles of Johannesburg before superior Boer forces compelled him and his men to surrender at Doornkop on the 2nd of Janaury 1896.
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The Last Shot at Colenso by Richard Caton Woodville


The Last Shot at Colenso by Richard Caton Woodville

Lt Roberts K.R.R. with Captain Schofield and Congreve, with all their ammunition used, they drew upon the emergency rounds of Case (their last shot) They stood to attention beside the gun and in an instant later fell pierced through by Boer Bullets. Lt Roberts earned his VC.
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Jameson's Last Stand, Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Richard Caton Woodville
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All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville


All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville

Illustrates the scene at Modderfontein Farm where a squadron of the 17th lancers were pinned down by a large Boer force, and fought to the finish. Modderfontein Farm in the Eastern Cape, about 10 miles from Tarkastad, was the the battle on the 17th September 1901, between the 17th Lancers who had camped there, and General Jan Christiaan Smut's Boer Commandos. C squadron of the 17th Lancers lost 3 Officers and 35 troopers, a single action in which the 17th Lancers lost more men in one day than any other day, inclduing that of the infamous charge of the Light Brigade. Also killed that day were three gunners from the Royal Garrison Artillery. Another account states that out of 130 men, 29 were killed and 41 wounded. All Officers had been killed or wounded.
Item Code : DHM0008All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville - Editions Available
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Original Lithograph circa 1904
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Race for the Copje by G Douglas Giles
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Royal Horse Artillery Crossing a River Under Fire by George Scott


Royal Horse Artillery Crossing a River Under Fire by George Scott

Item Code : DHM0099Royal Horse Artillery Crossing a River Under Fire by George Scott - Editions Available
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Ambush at Sannas Post by Terence Cuneo.
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Frederick Roberts Receives the Surrender of the Main Boer Field Army Commander, Piet Cronje at Paardeburg on 27th February 1900. by George Scott.


Frederick Roberts Receives the Surrender of the Main Boer Field Army Commander, Piet Cronje at Paardeburg on 27th February 1900. by George Scott.

This led the way for the British to advance towards Bloemfontain and onto Pretoria.
Item Code : DHM0125Frederick Roberts Receives the Surrender of the Main Boer Field Army Commander, Piet Cronje at Paardeburg on 27th February 1900. by George Scott. - Editions Available
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The Prisoner by Scott Kirkwood
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The Relief of Ladysmith by John Henry Frederick Bacon
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The Relief of Ladysmith by John Henry Frederick Bacon


The Relief of Ladysmith by John Henry Frederick Bacon

Sir George White welcomes Major Hubert Gough with these words Hello Hubert, how are you? Shortly afterwards, moved by the ovation given him by his soldiers and townsfolk, he acknowledged their support and ending with these words: Thank God we have kept the flag flying.
Item Code : DHM0943The Relief of Ladysmith by John Henry Frederick Bacon - Editions Available
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Frederick Roberts Receives the Surrender of the Main Boer Field Army Commander, Piet Cronje at Paardeburg on 27th February 1900. by George Scott.
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The Prisoner by Scott Kirkwood


The Prisoner by Scott Kirkwood

Commissioned by 201 (Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire Yeomanry) Battery, Royal Artillery in 1997 to commemorate bicentenary. Boer prisoner with early morning Yeomanry patrol, Transvaal, 1900.
Item Code : DHM1154The Prisoner by Scott Kirkwood - Editions Available
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Frederick Roberts Receives the Surrender of the Main Boer Field Army Commander, Piet Cronje at Paardeburg on 27th February 1900. by George Scott.
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Canadian Scout of the Veldt after William Barnes Wollen


Canadian Scout of the Veldt after William Barnes Wollen

Item Code : VAR0127Canadian Scout of the Veldt after William Barnes Wollen - Editions Available
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CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original Lithograph circa 1905
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Image size 16 inches x 22 inches (41cm x 56cm)none£500.00

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Pinned Down (Highlanders Engage Boers) by John Farquharson


Pinned Down (Highlanders Engage Boers) by John Farquharson

Item Code : VAR0128Pinned Down (Highlanders Engage Boers) by John Farquharson - Editions Available
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Original watercolour.
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Race for the Copje by G Douglas Giles


Race for the Copje by G Douglas Giles

Showing members of the 10th Hussars in South Africa, racing for the high ground against some Boers.
Item Code : DHM0171Race for the Copje by G Douglas Giles - Editions Available
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All That Was Left of Them by Richard Caton Woodville
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Within Sound of the Guns by Lady Elizabeth Butler.
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We tried hard to save the rest of the guns, possibly by Richard Caton Woodville


We tried hard to save the rest of the guns, possibly by Richard Caton Woodville

Plates from Valour and Victory by F Shaw & Co, published 1902.
Item Code : ANT0123We tried hard to save the rest of the guns, possibly by Richard Caton Woodville - Editions Available
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ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique lithograph.
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Image size 5.25 inches x 7 inches (13cm x 18cm)none£15.00

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His eyes turned up to heaven, his shoulders in a pool of blood,  possibly by Richard Caton Woodville


His eyes turned up to heaven, his shoulders in a pool of blood, possibly by Richard Caton Woodville

Plates from Valour and Victory by F Shaw & Co, published 1902.
Item Code : ANT0124His eyes turned up to heaven, his shoulders in a pool of blood, possibly by Richard Caton Woodville - Editions Available
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ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique lithograph.
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Major-General Baden Powell possibly by Richard Caton Woodville


Major-General Baden Powell possibly by Richard Caton Woodville

Plates from Valour and Victory by F Shaw & Co, published 1902.
Item Code : ANT0125Major-General Baden Powell possibly by Richard Caton Woodville - Editions Available
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ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique lithograph.
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Forward by John Charlton (1899)


Forward by John Charlton (1899)

Printed by Dangerfield Printing Co Ltd. circa 1902.
Item Code : JCLITH0001Forward by John Charlton (1899) - Editions Available
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PRINTChromolithograph,
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Image size 8 inches x 11 inches (20cm x 28cm)none£100.00

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Imperial Light Horse


Imperial Light Horse

Printed by Dangerfield Printing Co Ltd. circa 1902.
Item Code : JCLITH0002Imperial Light Horse - Editions Available
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PRINTChromolithograph,
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Wounded by John Charlton (1900)


Wounded by John Charlton (1900)

Printed by Dangerfield Printing Co Ltd. circa 1902.
Item Code : JCLITH0003Wounded by John Charlton (1900) - Editions Available
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PRINTChromolithograph,
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Disaster by John Charlton (1900)


Disaster by John Charlton (1900)

Printed by Dangerfield Printing Co Ltd. circa 1902.
Item Code : JCLITH0004Disaster by John Charlton (1900) - Editions Available
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PRINTChromolithograph,
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mage size 8 inches x 11 inches. (20cm x 28cm)none£100.00

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Guns to the Front by John Charlton (1899)


Guns to the Front by John Charlton (1899)

Printed by Dangerfield Printing Co Ltd. circa 1902.
Item Code : JCLITH0005Guns to the Front by John Charlton (1899) - Editions Available
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PRINTChromolithograph,
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Image size 5 inches x 7 inches (13.5cm x 18cm)none£80.00

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Ready by John Charlton (1900)


Ready by John Charlton (1900)

Printed by Dangerfield Printing Co Ltd. circa 1902.
Item Code : JCLITH0006Ready by John Charlton (1900) - Editions Available
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PRINTChromolithograph,
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Image size 8 inches x 11 inches. (20cm x 28cm)none£100.00

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Siege of Mafeking, 1900 by Henry Dupray


Siege of Mafeking, 1900 by Henry Dupray

Spotting over sky area.
Item Code : HD0015Siege of Mafeking, 1900 by Henry Dupray - Editions Available
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PRINT Antique print c.1890 mounted on thick card at the time.
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Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£70.00

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Battle of Colenso, 1899 by Henry Dupray


Battle of Colenso, 1899 by Henry Dupray

Few surface scratches with some spotting at right hand edge of print.
Item Code : HD0025Battle of Colenso, 1899 by Henry Dupray - Editions Available
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PRINT Antique print c.1890 mounted on thick card at the time.
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Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£80.00

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Surrender of Paardeburg, 1900 by Henry Dupray. (P)


Surrender of Paardeburg, 1900 by Henry Dupray. (P)

Some spotting in sky.
Item Code : HD0032Surrender of Paardeburg, 1900 by Henry Dupray. (P) - Editions Available
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ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original antique print c.1890, mounted on card at the time.
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Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£75.00

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